Steamed bread


Hello foodies! It has been forever since I last blogged, and every time I cook or eat something yummy, I feel a pang of guilt in my stomach, and promise myself that I am going to start doing weekly posts again, and after months, which accidentally turned into a year of talking and no doing, here I go…

So much has happened since I last posted! I…got a new job in reproductive health, adopted two furry critters,

Giorgie

Jane

finished my Masters degree in Public Health

Kristen, Phumelele and I on Grad Day

and got engaged!

Engagement

The recipe I am going to share with you is Lulu’s Steamed bread. According to the interwebs, steamed bread is a traditional Zulu dish typically served with meat, although my experience tells me that steamed bread has become a commonplace in many’s homes. I first tried it when Lulu brought it to work freshly baked for a colleague’s birthday and I simply couldn’t stop eating it, despite being stuffed to the brim. It is so moist and has a subtle sweetness that I can never resist. So of course I got the recipe and immediately went home to make it. Despite Lulu accidentally giving me the wrong ratios due to that the recipe is so engrained in her food repertoire that she no longer needs to measure and also accidentally waterlogging my ball of dough in boiling water, my bread was ridiculously delicious. Luckily, my second time making steamed bread was easier and just as delicious. Steamed bread can be eaten with anything from curry, stew and mexican food, to only with a smidgy of butter, which Lulu and I did all week when we were away on a work trip.

Steamed bread (serves four + leftovers)

IMG_2340[1]IMG_2338[1]

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 2 1/4 tbl sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp dried yeast
  • 1 cup lukewarm water

Directions

  1. Mix all the dry ingredients together and then mix in the warm water
  2. Knead the dough (the dough should be slightly sticky-if it’s too sticky, add some more flour)
  3. Let the dough rise for about an hour
  4. Knead the dough some more
  5. Put the dough in a greased metal bowl
  6. Add about 5cm of water to a large pot that the metal bowl can fit into
  7. Gently place the bowl in the water (Don’t let the bowl touch the bottom of the pot; if it does, add a bit more water so that the bowl floats a little bit)
  8. Put on the lid
  9. Bring the water to a boil. Once the water starts to bowl, turn the heat down a bit so that the water maintains a lower, less hectic boil. Don’t keep the burner high enough for the water to bubble up into your dough bowl.
  10. Cook the bread for an hour. DO NOT open the pot lid until the hour is up.
  11. Carefully remove the bowl from the pot.
  12. Serve while still warm with anything!

 

 

 

Asian burgers


Sorry foodies that it has been so long since I last posted! I have been extremely busy riding camels in Israel, reading for class, and working on my thesis. But I made it a priority to post a new recipe this week, so here it is!

My camel

My camel

Camel in the Judaean Desert

Ty and I on our camel in the Judaean Desert

The markets in Israel were beautiful, yet chaotic and overstimulating. They were overcrowded with people and full of pungent smells, bright colours, fresh produce, and shouting, haggling, beckoning shop owners. A food adventurers heaven…

Jerusalem shuk

everyone in Jerusalem preparing for the shabbos

How we felt at the market

How we felt at the market

And now to my recipe…

I am a very traditional (I mean lazy) lunchtime cooker. I will typically choose eating leftovers from dinner the night before or throw together a sandwich with whatever fillings are in the fridge. However, my favorite thing to splurge on is a weekend gourmet sandwich made from deliciously fresh ciabatta from Knead, and layers of Woolie’s salami and edam, rocket, avo, and Pesto Princess pesto, made for Ty and I to eat while we sit on the couch watching our favorite series of the moment.

Last weekend, I was feeling adventurous, so I decided to make Asian burgers as a Sunday lunch treat. The key is to use whatever ordinary ingredients you happen to have in the fridge and turn them into something fancy and delicious.

After Ty took his first bite he said “You need to open a restaurant”. *Sigh* Maybe one day!

Asian Burgers (serves 2 + leftovers)

Asian burgers

cooking my Asian burgers

Asian burgers

The final product

Ingredients

  • 400g raw minced beef
  • 1/2 finely chopped onion
  • 1-2 sprigs finely chopped green onions
  • 1 handful finely chopped fresh coriander
  • 1 large brown mushroom finely chopped
  • 1 large carrot peeled and grated
  • 1 heaped tsp finely chopped garlic
  • 1 tbl sugar
  • 1 tbl soy sauce
  • 1 tsp tumeric
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tbl curry
  • 1 tbl jeera
  • sprinkle of chili flakes
  • salt & pepper to taste

Directions

  1. gently mix all the ingredients together, minus the salt
  2. using your hands, form large, thick patties
  3. grill the patties in a lightly oiled panned for 10-15 minutes until both sides are golden
  4. sprinkle some salt on the patties
  5. serve (with mayo if you’d like) on slices of toasted bread

Ty’s Worms and Mince


From a very young age, Ty absolutely loved eating worms and his favorite type of worms were those slathered with mince and tomato sauce.  His second love was Portuguese Chicken Spice, a spicy blend of chilies, lemon, garlic, and paprika, which his dad taught him to put on everything.  So, when Ty became a teenager and started cooking dinner for his family, he inevitably made his famous Worms and Mince with Portuguese Chicken Spice every time.

Over the years, Ty became a Worms and Mince Masterchef and when he moved down to Cape Town, he effectively sustained himself by eating this ultimate comfort food for days on end.  On Sunday evenings he would pull out the largest pot in his kitchen, prepare 1200g of Worms and Mince, eat some for dinner, and store the rest in in as many tupperware containers as he could find. For the remainder of the week he would dig into his reserve and prepare solo Worms and Mince or carb-on-carb Worm Sandwiches for lunch and dinner.

When I met Ty he wooed me with his Worms and Mince, which no doubt worked because the only way to my heart is through my stomach.  He shared his Worms-cooking secrets with me but no matter how many times I cook it, I am never able to re-create the perfect blend of mince, tomatoes, and spices that Ty accomplishes with ease every single time.

As a food-venturist, I am always experimenting and changing up recipes with new ingredients, but If I ever attempt to deviate from Ty’s original recipe, he protests vehemently because “A Classic’s a Classic”.  However, over the years I have worn him down and sometimes he allows me to incorporate mushrooms, green peppers, or cabbage.

Ty’s Worms and Mince

A Ty Classic

Ingredients

  • 3 chopped garlic cloves or 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 chopped onion
  • 500g minced beef
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 2 heaped tsp portuguese chicken spice
  • 1 can of tomatoes and onion mix
  • 300g pasta of your choice
Instructions
In a large pan, saute the garlic and onions in oil until lightly browned.  Add the mince and at this time you can also add any veggies you would like (although Ty would be disappointed by this). Next mix in the basil, portuguese chicken spice, salt, and pepper.  Once the meat is nearly finished cooking, add the tomato sauce and bring to a simmer.  At this point cook your pasta of choice, which is spaghetti for Ty because they resemble worms of course and penne for me because I enjoy spiking it with my fork and am convinced that the flavors are better retained due to its ridginess.  Once the pasta is ready, you can either do the Ty method which is to mix the pasta into your sauce or the Kim method which is to spoon large amounts of sauce directly over your pasta. And sometimes we even grate lots of cheese on top.  No matter which pasta you use or how you serve it up, nothin’ is better than coming home, falling on the couch, and not lifting a finger as your man cooks you Worms and Mince after a long day at work…

Zingy Asian Salad


Asian food has always been one of my favorite food genres.  Growing up we went to the same Chinese restaurant every week.  We were like part of the family and they always knew what we were going to order – which was Moo Shoo Chicken with hoisin sauce wrapped in tortilla-like pancakes for me.  Although I have had to convince Ty of its awesomeness over the years, the pivotal moment for our kitchen was when Ty fell in love with sushi and wholeheartedly began endorsing experimentation with Asian flavors at home.

Sometime last year we decided to have steak for dinner and I was determined to try out something new.  When I first began cooking, Epicurious.com was my gateway website to experimenting with ingredients, cooking gourmet, and following food blogs. So, I consulted Epicurious for a recipe and found a great one that included all of my favorite Asian flavors.  It turned out to be really excellent, which was confirmed by Ty, who claims that he does not like soy sauce, although I put it in my dishes all the time and he continues to love my cooking.

This afternoon I was craving something cold, fresh, and zingy, so I adapted the original recipe to make an Asian salad that was super delicious.

Zingy Asian Salad

Ingredients

For the dressing

  • 1 1/2 tbl soy sauce
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tbl lemon
  • 1 chopped garlic clove
  • 1 heaping tsp chopped ginger
  • 1 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbl water
  • a dash of red chili flakes
  • salt and pepper to taste
For the salad
  • 2 stalks chopped spring onion
  • 1 cup cabbage
  • 1 grated carrot
  • 1 grated zuchinni
  • 1/2 julienned red or yellow pepper
  • a handful of mange tout
  • 1 tbl sesame seeds
  • a handful of chopped fresh coriander

In separate bowls, mix together the dressing ingredients and the salad ingredients.  Pour the dressing over the salad and toss until nicely coated.